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I decided to sell the unexpected GH3 when the E-M5 was repaired. Thanks to the lens and grip bundle deal I got on purchase I came out even, or near enough. I put the money towards upgrading my portrait lens from the Olympus 45/1.8.

As I’ve mentioned before, the choice for me is either the Panasonic 42.5/1.2, or buy into the Fujifilm X system with the X-E2 and get the 56/1.2. I went for the Fujifilm option based on my experience with the X100S. It’s a lovely camera to work with and it significantly out-performed the Olympus E-M5 for the fireworks and tall ships.

So despite being fully bought into mirrorless cameras, I still have a Canon 7D hanging around. This is now used as a dedicated telephoto camera, mainly for moving targets, and the only two lenses that have survived the move to mirrorless are the Canon 70-200/4 IS and the Canon 400/5.6.

This past weekend was the Tall Ships Regatta and Festival in Greenwich. It was spread over a number of sites in the area including Cutty Sark (packed solid, horrible), Woolwich Arsenal and Canary Wharf.

Since I discovered the Google PageSpeed Insights metrics I’ve been tweaking my blog output to maximise the score. Recent design changes mean I’m now scoring very well on these tests.

I’ve bought a Panasonic GH3. This wasn’t in the plan, and it certainly wasn’t in the budget, yet here we are.

A few months ago I described how I switched this blog from Wordpress to my own static blog generation tool called DmBlog. DmBlog was quick and dirty but worked really well, and was a big improvement in usability over Wordpress.

I also found the generated site method really useful for making design changes easily and performing invisible tweaks to the output HTML. I wanted to extend DmBlog to also cover the non-blog sections of my site.

Whilst Micro Four Thirds (MFT) has the widest selection of lenses of the mirrorless formats, it has an issue in the standard zoom, 28-70mm equivalent, category. Although there are many lenses in that range, the majority are F3.5-5.6 kit lens variations and if you want something a bit better there are two options; the Panasonic 12-35/2.8 and Olympus 12-40/2.8.

The two F2.8 lenses are credible options with different advantages, but they both cost around £800 which is too rich for my blood, and secondhand values are robust. So ultimately you have a choice of a kit lens or spending £800.

I’ve put some effort into redesigning this blog to make it more readable.

The previous design was (mostly) fine on 10" tablets or desktop devices but was pretty useless on smaller screens where devices would have to render in desktop mode, requiring the reader to zoom and scroll. On a 5" inch phone it was just about usable in landscape, but hardly pleasant. I wanted to do better.

I’ve sold my underperforming Olympus 17/1.8 lens and bought an Olympus 25/1.8. The aim was to have a shorter length micro 4/3 lens that is actually worth using.

This isn’t a stand-alone review of the Olympus 25/1.8, but more of a discussion in the context of my existing equipment.

A few months ago I wrote my X100S vs E-M5 comparison, and I largely stand by it.

But with the benefit of more time a few things have sunk in. I’ve found myself choosing the X100S for casual photography far more often than the E-M5. I’m making this choice despite the E-M5 being a better photographic tool in many ways, the image stabiliser, the superior focusing, and the better software workflow. So why is the E-M5 getting left at home, and does it imply my m4/3 setup is ‘broken’?

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